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Archive for the ‘Health’ Category

Vegetables for health

In General, Health, Misc, Personal on June 16, 2007 at 10:14 am
Vegetable Amount

Minerals Contained
(in descending order)

Vitamins Contained
(in descending order)

Artichoke

Artichoke nutritional information

One medium cooked with no added salt has 4.2 grams protein and 6.5 grams of fiber.

Potassium – 425 mg
Phosphorus – 103 mg
Magnesium – 72 mg
Calcium – 54 mg
Also contains small amounts of selenium, iron , manganese , copper and zinc.

Vitamin C – 12 mg
Niacin – 1.2 mg
Pantothenic Acid – .5 mg
Folate – 61.2 mcg
Vitamin A – 212 IU
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Asparagus

Asparagus nutritional information

Half cup (about 4 spears) cooked with no added salt contains over 2 grams of protein and almost 1.5 grams of fiber.

Potassium – 144 mg
Phosphorus – 48.5 mg
Calcium – 18 mg
Sodium – 10 mg
Magnesium – 9 mg
Also contains small amounts of selenium , iron , manganese, copper and zinc.

Vitamin A – 485 IU
Vitamin C – 9.7 mg
Niacin – .974 mg
Folate – 131 mcg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Broccoli

 

Half cup cooked with no added salt contains 2.3 grams protein and 2.3 grams fiber.

Potassium – 228 mg
Phosphorus – 46 mg
Calcium – 36 mg
Sodium – 28 mg
Magnesium – 18.7 mg
Iron – .65 mg
Vitamin K – 110 mcg
Also contains small amounts of selenium, manganese , copper and zinc .

Vitamin A – 1083 IU
Vitamin C – 58 mg
Niacin – .45 mg
Pantothenic Acid – .4 mg
Folate – 39 mcg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Carrots

 

Half cup cooked with no added salt contains .85 grams protein and 2.6 grams fiber.

Potassium – 177 mg
Sodium – 51.5 mg
Calcium – 24 mg
Magnesium – 10 mg
Iron – .48 mg
Also contains small amounts of selenium, manganese, zinc.

Vitamin A – 19,152 IU
Vitamin C – 1.8 mg
Niacin – .4 mg
Pantothenic Acid – .2 mg
Vitamin B6 – .2 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Cauliflower

Cauliflower - nutritional information

Half cup cooked with no added salt contains 1.1 grams protein and 1.7 grams fiber.

Potassium – 88 mg
Phosphorus – 19.8 mg
Calcium – 9.9 mg
Sodium – 9.3 mg
Magnesium – 5.6 mg
Also contains small amounts of selenium,iron , manganese ,copper and zinc.

Vitamin C – 27.5 mg
Vitamin A – 1.5 IU
Pantothenic Acid – .3 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Corn

Corn - nutritional information

One ear, cooked with no salt contains 2.6 grams protein and 2.1 grams fiber.

Potassium – 191.7 mg
Phosphorus – 79.3 mg
Magnesium – 24.6 mg
Sodium – 13 mg
Calcium – 1.5 mg
selenium – .6 mg
Iron – .5 mg
Zinc – .4 mg
Also contains small amounts of manganese and copper .

Vitamin C – 4.8 mg
Vitamin A – 167 IU
Niacin – 1.2 mg
Folate – 27.3 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – .68 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Cucumber

 

Half a cup of sliced cucumber with skins contains .36 grams protein and .42 grams fiber.

Potassium – 74.9 mg
Phosphorus – 1.4 mg
Magnesium – 5.7 mg
Sodium – 1 mg
Calcium – 7.3 mg
Also contains small amounts of selenium, iron, manganese, copper and zinc.

Vitamin C – 2.6 mg
Vitamin A – 111.8 IU
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Green Pepper

 

One small raw pepper contains .66 grams protein and 1.3 grams fiber.

Potassium – 131 mg
Phosphorus – 14 mg
Magnesium – 7.4mg
Calcium – 6.7 mg
Sodium – 1.48 mg
Also contains small amounts of selenium , iron , manganese, copper and zinc.

Vitamin A – 467.7i u
Vitamin C – 66 mg
Niacin – .4 mg
Folate – 6.8 mcg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Kale

Kale - nutritional information

One cup of cooked kale with no added salt contains 2.5 grams protein and 2.6 grams fiber.

Potassium – 296.4 mg
Phosphorus – 36.4 mg
Magnesium – 23.4 mg
Calcium – 32 mg
Sodium – 29.9 mg
Iron – 1.2 mg
Manganese – .5 mg
Selenium – 1.2 mg
Vitamin K – 1062 mcg Also contains small amounts of copper and zinc .

Vitamin A – 9,620 IU
Vitamin C – 53.3 mg
Niacin – .6 mg
Folate – 17 mcg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Lima Beans

Lima Beans - nutritional information

One cup of cooked large lima beans with no added salt contains 14.7 grams protein and 13.2 grams fiber.

Potassium – 955 mg
Phosphorus – 208.7 mg
Magnesium – 8.8 mg
Calcium – 32 mg
Selenium – 8.5 mg
Iron – 4.5 mg
Sodium – 3.8 mg
Zinc – 1.8 mg
Manganese – .8 mg
copper – .44 mg

Pantothenic Acid – .8 mg
Niacin – .8 mg
Folate – 156 mcg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Mushroom

Mushroom nutritional information

Half a cup of raw mushrooms contains 1.0 grams of protein and .42 grams of fiber.

Potassium – 129.5 mg
Phosphorus – 36.4 mg
Magnesium – 3.5 mg
Selenium – 3 mg
Calcium – 1.8 mg
Sodium – 1.4 mg
Iron – .36 mg
Also contains small amounts of manganese, copper and zinc .

Vitamin D – 26.6 IU
Niacin – 1.4 mg
Vitamin C – .8 mg
Pantothenic Acid – .5 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Onions

Onion - nutritional information

One small onion cooked without salt contains .8 grams protein and 1.3 grams of fiber.

Potassium – 110 mg
Phosphorus – 23.1 mg
Calcium – 14 mg
Magnesium – 7 mg
Sodium – 2.1 mg
Selenium – .42 mg
Also contains small amounts of iron, manganese, copper and zinc.

Vitamin C – 4.5 mg
Folate – 9 mcg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Peas

Peas - nutritional information

One cup of boiled peas with no salt added contains 8.58 grams of protein and 8.8 grams of fiber.

Potassium – 433.6 mg
Phosphorus – 187.2 mg
Magnesium – 62.4 mg
Calcium – 43.2 mg
Sodium – 4.8 mg
Selenium – 3.0 mg
Iron – 2.5 mg
Zinc – 1.9 mg
Manganese – .8 mg
Also contains small amount of copper .

Vitamin A – 955.2iu
Vitamin C – 22.72 mg
Niacin – 3.23 mg
Folate – 100.8 mcg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) – .41 mg
Vitamin B6 – .35 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Potatoes

Potato - nutritional information

One medium baked potato without salt contains 3.0 grams of protein and 2.3 grams of fiber.

Potassium – 610 mg
Phosphorus – 78 mg
Magnesium – 39 mg
Calcium – 7.8 mg
Sodium – 7.8 mg
Iron – .55 mg
Selenium – .46 mg
Zinc – .45 mg
Also contains small amounts of manganese and copper .

Vitamin C – 20 mg
Niacin – 2.18 mg
Pantothenic Acid – .9 mg
Vitamin B6 – .5 mg
Folate – 14 mcg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Spinach

Spinach nutritional information

One cup of raw spinach contains .86 grams of protein and .81 grams of fiber.

Potassium – 167.4 mg
Phosphorus – 14.7 mg
Magnesium – 23.7 mg
Calcium – 29.7 mg
Sodium – 23.7 mg
Iron – .81 mg
Selenium – .3 mg
– Vitamin K – 145 mcg
Also contains small amounts of manganese, copper and zinc .

Vitamin A – 2014.5 mg
Vitamin C – 8.43 mg
Folate – 58.2 mcg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Squash, Summer

Summer Squash (Zucchini) - nutritional information

One cup of sliced summer squash, baked with no added salt contains 1.65 grams of protein and 2.5 grams of fiber.

Potassium – 345.6 mg
Phosphorus – 7.2 mg
Magnesium – 43.2 mg
Calcium – 48.6 mg
Sodium – 1.8 mg
Iron – .65 mg
Manganese – .38 mg
Selenium – .36 mg
Zinc – .7 mg
Also contains small amount of copper.

Vitamin A – 516.6 mg
Vitamin C – 9.9 mg
Niacin – .92 mg
Folate – 36 mcg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Squash, Winter

Squash, Winter - nutritional information

One cup of cubed winter squash, baked with no added salt contains 1.02 grams of protein and 2.07 grams of fiber.

Potassium – 181.3 mg
Phosphorus – 21.7 mg
Magnesium – 17.0 mg
Calcium – 32.5 mg
Sodium – 27.9 mg
Iron – .52 mg
Selenium – .46 mg
Also contains small amounts of manganese, copper and zinc .

Vitamin A – 17.5 mg
Vitamin C – 5.4 mg
Niacin – 1.25 mg
Folate – 57.4 mcg
Pantothenic Acid – .55 mg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts.

Sweet Potatoes

Sweet Potato - nutritional information

One medium sweet potato baked in its skin contains 1.96 grams of protein and 3.42 grams of fiber.

Potassium – 273 mg
Phosphorus – 29.5 mg
Magnesium – 13.5 mg
Calcium – 6.2 mg
Sodium – 11.0 mg
Iron – .55 mg
Selenium – .5 mg
Manganese – .6 mg
Zinc – .3 mg
Also contains small amount of copper .

Vitamin A – 24,877 mg
Vitamin C – 28.0 mg
Pantothenic Acid – .74 mg
Niacin – .69 mg
Folate – 26.2 mcg
Contains some other vitamins in small amounts

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Why do we have bad breath in the morning?

In General, Health, Misc, Personal, Tips N Tricks on February 7, 2007 at 2:03 pm

Science guru Bill Nye explains that the flow of saliva slows down during sleep. As a result, mouths don’t get the same level of oxygen as they do while we’re active. This allows anaerobic bacteria, which don’t need oxygen, to thrive. “The waste products from these bacteria often contain sulfur — and those compounds of sulfur are what we smell.”

Onions are also nasty culprits of this type of bad breath because they contain sulfur. So limit your raw onion snacking habits, and you’re ahead of the game.

According to BreezeCare, there are additional causes for morning breath. Mucus in your nose can thicken while you sleep, and your tongue falls to the back of your throat — both of which provide welcome environments for anaerobic bacteria.

Treatments for bad breath abound, however the two common solutions are to brush your tongue to remove excess plaque, and the use of an antimicrobial mouthwash. Good luck, and may your breath be as fresh as a Tic Tac.

Source

20/20 Vision Explained

In General, Health, Misc, Personal on February 4, 2007 at 9:53 pm

Visual acuity is expressed as a fraction. The top number refers to the distance you stand from the chart. This is usually 20 feet. The bottom number indicates the distance at which a person with normal eyesight could correctly read the line with the smallest letters. Normal vision is considered 20/20. If your vision is 20/40, the line you correctly read at 20 feet could be read by a person with normal vision at 40 feet.

If your optometrist says you have 20/60 vision, that means you are able to discriminate characters at 20 feet away from an eye chart that a person with normal acuity can see at a distance of 60 feet.

Of course, just because 20/20 vision is normal doesn’t mean it’s perfect. A small percentage of the population is blessed with vision better than 20/20, and just recently researchers unveiled corrective lens that offered vision.

Source

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Milk is a Skin Miracle

In General, Health, HowTo, Misc, Tips N Tricks on February 1, 2007 at 12:26 pm

Here is a natural resource that makes your skin look soft and beautiful. And it doesn’t cost you a fortune. Yahoo Food reports this and so many people have commented saying that they’ve tried this and it works great.

If Cleopatra indulged in all the beauty treatments attributed to her, she wouldn’t have had time to rule her empire, seduce Mark Antony, or learn Egyptian. But a girl’s gotta bathe, so the one skin-smoother she probably did rely on-milk baths-no doubt helped her bring Caesar and Mark to heel. Did Cleo know something we’ve forgotten? Actually, yes.

“Milk is a super soother for chapping, windburn, sunburn, eczema, and other skin irritations,” says New York dermatologist Amy Wechsler, MD. “It contains proteins (whey and casein), fat, amino acids, lactic acid, and vitamins A and D, all of which calm dry, upset skin.”

Dr. Wechsler suggests applying compresses dipped in cool milk for irritations like sunburn and eczema. But be sure to use whole milk; skim won’t do because it doesn’t contain fat, one of milk’s most soothing components. If compresses aren’t practical-say, you’ve managed to broil the backs of your legs on a beach getaway-a milk bath will give you some relief: Add 2 to 4 cups to a warm (not hot) tub and soak for 20 minutes. You can use powdered whole milk too. Sprinkle the amount of powder needed to make a quart of milk under the faucet as the water flows out.

Milky baths also soften skin, according to Wechsler. Milk’s lactic acid weakens the “glue” that lets dead, ready-to-be-shed cells stick to the skin’s surface, making it look dull and dry. Soak for 15 minutes, then give your body a gentle neck-to-toe scrubdown with a bath brush, loofah, or washcloth. This will slough off those dead cells, leaving skin smoother and softer.

Not quite sure about pouring a quart of milk into the tub? The beauty people have visited the dairy too. For instance, Fresh Milk Formula Bath Foam ($35 for 15.8 oz at http://www.sephora.com) contains milk as well as shea butter and glycerine. But if your skin is very irritated or totally winter-whipped, says Wechsler, try the real thing. It should leave your whole body feeling creamy.

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Top 10 Foods for a Good Night’s Sleep

In General, Health, HowTo, Misc, Tips N Tricks on February 1, 2007 at 12:18 pm

Everyone loves to have a good night sleep. But these days, with the kind of stress everyone is into, we all know that’s kind of a hard thing to get a good night’s sleep. Yahoo Food suggests these 10 foods for a good night’s sleep. Take a look.

Bananas. They’re practically a sleeping pill in a peel. In addition to a bit of soothing melatonin and serotonin, bananas contain magnesium, a muscle relaxant.

Chamomile tea. The reason chamomile is such a staple of bedtime tea blends is its mild sedating effect – it’s the perfect natural antidote for restless minds/bodies.

Warm milk. It’s not a myth. Milk has some tryptophan – an amino acid that has a sedative – like effect – and calcium, which helps the brain use tryptophan. Plus there’s the psychological throw-back to infancy, when a warm bottle meant “relax, everything’s fine.”

Honey. Drizzle a little in your warm milk or herb tea. Lots of sugar is stimulating, but a little glucose tells your brain to turn off orexin, a recently discovered neurotransmitter that’s linked to alertness.

Potatoes. A small baked spud won’t overwhelm your GI tract, and it clears away acids that can interfere with yawn-inducing tryptophan. To up the soothing effects, mash it with warm milk.

Oatmeal. Oats are a rich source of sleep – inviting melatonin, and a small bowl of warm cereal with a splash of maple syrup is cozy – plus if you’ve got the munchies, it’s filling too.

Almonds. A handful of these heart-healthy nuts can be snooze-inducing, as they contain both tryptophan and a nice dose of muscle-relaxing magnesium.

Flaxseeds. When life goes awry and feeling down is keeping you up, try sprinkling 2 tablespoons of these healthy little seeds on your bedtime oatmeal. They’re rich in omega-3 fatty acids, a natural mood lifter.

Whole-wheat bread. A slice of toast with your tea and honey will release insulin, which helps tryptophan get to your brain, where it’s converted to serotonin and quietly murmurs “time to sleep.”

Turkey. It’s the most famous source of tryptophan, credited with all those Thanksgiving naps. But that’s actually modern folklore. Tryptophan works when your stomach’s basically empty, not overstuffed, and when there are some carbs around, not tons of protein. But put a lean slice or two on some whole-wheat bread mid-evening, and you’ve got one of the best sleep inducers in your kitchen.

Try some of these and see if you can get those 8 hours sleepfully.

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